Thailand Travels: Part 3

Bangkok Day 2

After visiting places of worship the day before and admiring Thailand’s architecture, the next day was dedicated to celebrating the Thai New Year. In Thailand, this celebration consisted of city wide water fights, dancing, and music. Any attempts of remaining dry were futile, and so we decided to join the fun. As the sun ascended high into the sky signaling the start of the day, vendors slowly began to open up shop in preparation for the big day. Their merchandise; a colourful assortment of plastic water guns, waterproof phone cases, goggles, and anything else we could possibly need. After examining the different weapons of choice, we settled on two brightly coloured water guns: one the colour of bubblegum and the other as blue as the sky above us. With affordability in mind, the cartoon baby roosters and penguin decals on my water gun were but a small price to pay for affordability.

With water guns in our hand, we ventured out into the war zone where I was immediately caught off guard and sprayed with water by two Aussies on vacation. “If you’re holding, you’re getting wet,” they playfully stated and sauntered off to find their next victim. If this was the way the day was going to shape up to be, I was all for it! The day would end up proving to be full of similar instances, as locals and foreigners came together to engage in the city wide water fight and dancing. It was day full of joy and laughter, and one in which cultural divides were momentarily erased. Despite coming from a multicultural city, it was unlike anything I had experienced in my own city. The fault being that I live in a city that is always “too busy.” We are too busy to make time to see loved ones, too busy to make time for our passions, too busy to work out, too busy to sleep, too busy to listen, too busy to live. Our lives like a broken record, stuck on the same part day after day after day. It was time for a change, and with Songkran the record had been switched and a whole new tune began to play.

As we traversed down the streets, water splashed us from every angle. From large buckets of water, hoses, and water guns the festival was in full swing. Drenched to the bone, everyone danced along to both popular American hits and Thai music. The highlight of it all; seeing the smiles on everyone’s face and the giggles of little kids as they attempted to soak you with their small kid friendly water guns. I had a remarkable time during Songkran and I encourage anyone visiting Thailand to visit during their New Year. It is a time of people coming together, and as I danced on the streets of Thailand with our faces covered in talc, all I could feel was pure bliss. With all life’s worries and troubles dissolving away. Regardless of what tomorrow would bring, this moment would always be mine and nobody would ever take that away from me. During times of struggle, it is this moment I come back to. It is this moment I cherish. If you are reading this and facing a moment of darkness, please note that there is light and don’t ever give up. I have been in your shoes many times, and there is always a way out. So engrave those moments of happiness in your mind, and on your rainiest days remind yourself that there is light and you will find it again.

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Bangkok Day Three

After pocketing my moment of happiness the day before, our time in Bangkok was drawing to a close. With a refreshed mind and body, our itinerary for the final day included shopping malls, local parks, paddle boating, and supporting local causes through our love of food. Our first stop, MBK Center. Now I thought the malls were Canada were big but nothing could prepare me for the MBK Center. The place has around 2000 shops, restaurants and services outlets including both higher end and stall like setups. It was like ” a city within a city,” and for those who enjoy shopping, it could be described as their personal heaven. For me, however, it was far from my personal heaven. My advice than is if you are like me, steer clear and opt for smaller outdoor markets instead. Your mind and body will thank you. However, for all my shop-a-holics out there, the race has begun and with so much too see, you better start running!

And so, after tackling the Behemoth also known as the MBK Center and rewarding ourselves with delicious Pad Thai, our journey continued. Next stop: Lumphini Park. After being surrounded by chaos in the MBK center, it was here we rested and took a moment to enjoy nature. The sounds of nature filling our ears and warming our hearts. It was here that we rested, we selfied, and even managed to paddle boat on the lake as the sun began to set. It was a great way to finish off the day, but before we could do so, we had one more very important stop, Cabbages & Condoms.

Cabbages & Condoms is a local restaurant with a cause. Upon entering the restaurant from the outside street, you notice a shift in ambience. With exposed wooden beams, warm lighting, and tropical greenery throughout the restaurant, feelings of content wash over you. Pair this with all their profits supporting programs in “primary health, education, HIV/AIDS, rural development, environment and water and it is easy to see why this place has become such a popular spot for locals and tourists alike. As we were escorted to our seats, the mission to support reproductive health was evident everywhere. From sculptures made of condoms decorating the restaurant, information regarding their mission plastered on the walls, and free condoms being provided to customers the place meant business. With sexual health often being a taboo topic in many societies, Cabbages & Condoms had arrived and was ready to start a dialogue.

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Final Thoughts

My time in Bangkok is something I will never forget. With its incredible architecture and places of worship, water fights and dancing in the streets, strolls through city parks, and visiting places supporting local causes it was a city which evoked so much happiness. It served as a reminder to be present and make time for the important things in life. While, I understand that I have been fortunate enough to have the means to travel and experience so many wonderful things, I am here to tell you that happiness does not only exist outside of the borders of your own city. Thus, I urge you to recognize the small joys in your own life and to make time for things you love and the people you love. We all experience darkness, some of us having a better relationship with it than others but I want to remind you all reading this that there is light and asking for help to find it is not weakness but strength. I wish all you reading this, a wonderful week ahead and that you find your own pockets of sunshine as I have. Until next time!

Thailand Travels: Part 2

Bangkok, Thailand

After spending a few days hanging out with elephants, ziplining in the wilderness, and having the knots all over our body smoothed out it was time for the next part of our adventure. We were headed to Bangkok and in doing so we would be arriving during one of the biggest holidays in Thailand: Songkran. Songkran is the celebration of the Thai New Year which occurs on April 13 every year. Now if you are like myself and celebrate New Year’s Day on January 1st and think that is a big celebration, than I am telling you that nothing can prepare you for the celebration of Songkran. That being said, Songkran is more than a time for partying but is a time of reflection and worship. During this period, people visit temples, provide offerings to the monks, and bathe Buddha statues as a sign of worship. And so, it was important that before we delve into the celebrations to visit these places of worship and witness their beautify first hand. Our first stop: Wat Arun.

Wat Arun is located on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River. To get there, one needs to head to the pier and for only a few baht, a river shuttle boat takes you across the river to where the temple resides. Entry into the temple is 50 baht and after paying our fee, we set off to explore the grounds. Wat Arun is commonly referred to as The Temple of Dawn. It derives its name from the Hindu god of light, Aruna and is famous for the way the first light of morning reflects off its porcelain facade and brightly coloured glass designs. The temple was a stunning with its intricate designs, magnificent spires, and grandiose sculptures of soldiers and guardians at the base of the temple. It was a perfect way to start our day, a quiet reprieve with beautiful manicured grounds. After admiring the temple and walking the grounds past market stalls and performances going on, it was time to head back to the other side of the river to our next destination: The Grand Palace.

The Grand Palace is a massive complex of several buildings, and used to be the official residence of the monarchs of Thailand. When we arrived to The Grand Palace, it was packed! Due to our arriving during the Thai new year, people from all around the world and locals all congregated together to admire the architecture, pay respect to the monks, and visit the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. Although maneuvering through the crowds was difficult, the reason for its popularity. The complex was breathtakingly beautiful. With rich emerald greens, lapis lazuli blues, terra cotta reds, and golden hues the buildings gleamed in the scorching Thai sun. Just like Wat Arun, the complex was contained large guardian statues and a multitude of Buddhist sculptures. As we walked within the compound, we would eventually stop at the temple to find a moment of peace and quiet away from the scorching Thai heat. After removing our shoes, we entered the temple and were given a moment of reprieve from the scorching Thai sun and chaos outside. Noise was kept at a murmur and the cold ground beneath us soothed our overheated bodies. After exiting the temple and admiring the colourful buildings of The Grand Palace for some time, it was time to head to our final destination before it closed, Wat Pho (The Temple of Reclining Buddha).

Bless my friend for getting a photo of the Reclining Buddha

Now I’m going to be completely honest in that I didn’t appreciate Wat Pho as much as I should for the main reason that by the end of this day I was absolutely exhausted that there is little photographic evidence of our ventures in Wat Pho. That being said, Wat Pho is one that should definitely be on your itinerary in that it offers you the beauty of Thai architecture and places of worship, without the chaos of The Grand Palace. It was here in which I was able to fully observe the practises of worship during this festive season. After seeing the impressive 46 metres long gold leaf covered Buddha, we walked along the grounds in which we witnessed people bathing Buddha statues, praying, and would eventually encounter Buddhist monks going about their evening in the courtyard. After the chaos of being in The Grand Palace, Wat Pho was the perfect way to end the day. As the sun began to descend, the grounds grew quieter and so we sat down to finally rest our tired aching feet. It had been a long day, and despite my previous hesitation to visit the temple it wound up being the highlight of my day. After sitting down to reflect and relax, it was time to head back home and rest. Tomorrow would be filled with all new adventures, complete with water fights, dancing in the streets, and cheap water guns and we had to be prepared.